The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty

The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty

Author: Clayton M Christensen, Efosa Ojomo, Karen Dillon

Publisher: HarperBusiness (January 15, 2019)

HBXer–Marvin Hansen ‘s recommendation:

  • When I started reading my copy, I got a deeper understanding that the prosperity paradox explains the phenomena of diminishing return that is so prevalent in modern day capitalism.The solution, while counter-intuitive, also explains the enormous success of very large unicorns like Uber, and Alibaba and as such, the application of the prosperity paradox goes well beyond development aid.

(Book photos source: Amazon)

Optimizing Leadership (Harvard Extension School) Week 1-10

The list of music, videos, articles, and books is recommended from MGMT E-4178 Optimizing Leadership at Harvard Extension School (HES) in Fall 2017, dedicatorily shared by our HBXer – Marvin Hansen

Part One: Music

***

1. Stephen Walking – Walkers [Monstercat Release]

2. Heist – Lindsey Stirling

3. Brighter Future – Big Gigantic (ft. Naaz)

4. Skillet – Hero

5. Big Gigantic – The Little Things ft. Angela McCluskey

6. audiomachine – Guardians at the Gate [GRV Extended RMX | Redux]

7. Oscar H Caballero – “Realm Of Infinity” [Epic Hybrid]

8. Ivan Torrent Rêverie Full Album

9. Sons Of Pythagoras – To Leave It All (Epic Powerful Intense Cinematic Action)

10. 2-Hour Epic Music Mix | Audiomachine – Most Beautiful & Powerful Music – Emotional Mix

 

Part Two: Video

***

1. Overcoming Laziness from Unconscious Incompetence to Conscious Competence – Mark Divine

2. Listening to Shame – Brené Brown (TED Talk 2012)

3. The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn – Jeremy Howard (TED Talk at TEDxBrussels 2014)

4. Eric Ries, entrepreneur-in-residence at Harvard Business School, explains how to find the human causes of technical problems: The 5 Ways (Harvard Business Review)

 

Part Three: Articles

***

1. Engaging People Strengths

2. Finding Out Your Strengths

3. Becoming A Leader

4. Talent Engagement

5. Handling Conflict

6. Ethics Artificial Intelligence

7. Leadership Styles

Part Four: Books

***

Soar Above: How to Use the Most Profound Part of Your Brain Under Any Kind of Stress

Author: Steven Stosny

Publisher: HCI (April 5, 2016)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: constructive climate

 

***

Collective Genius: The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation

Author: Linda A. Hil, Greg Brandeau, Emily Truelove, Kent Lineback

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (June 10, 2014)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: engaging people strengths

 

***

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Author: Ed Catmull, Amy Wallace

Publisher: Random House; 1 edition (April 8, 2014)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: engaging people strengths

 

***

Rising Strong: The Reckoning. The Rumble. The Revolution.

Author: Brené Brown

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau; 1 edition (August 25, 2015)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: engaging people strengths

 

***

The Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

Author: Brené Brown

Publisher: Hazelden Publishing; 1 edition (August 27, 2010)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: engaging people strengths

 

***

 

The First 90 Days: Proven Strategies for Getting Up to Speed Faster and Smarter, Updated and Expanded

Author: Michael D. Watkins

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; Revised ed. edition (May 14, 2013)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: becoming a leader

 

***

Sensemaking in Organizations (Foundations for Organizational Science)

Author: Karl Weick

Publisher: SAGE Publications, Inc; 1 edition (May 31, 1995)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: becoming a leader

 

***

Exercising Influence: A Guide For Making Things Happen at Work, at Home, and in Your Community

Author: B. Kim Barnes

Publisher: Pfeiffer; Revised edition (November 17, 2006)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: becoming a leader

 

***

Power Is the Great Motivator (Harvard Business Review Classics)

Author: David C. McClell, David H. Burnham

Publisher: Harvard Business Review (August 04, 2008)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: becoming a leader

 

***

Leadership Presence

Author: Kathy Lubar, Belle Linda Halpern

Publisher: Avery; Reprint edition (October 14, 2004)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: talent engagement

 

***

Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges

Author: Amy Cuddy

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; First Edition: December 2015 edition (December 22, 2015)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: talent engagement

 

***

Xi Jinping: The Governance of China: [English Language Version]

Author: Xi Jinping

Publisher: Shanghai Press (February 17, 2015)

Comments from HBXer – Marvin Hansen

  • If you want to understand where China is going and how it plans to get there, look no further than the official leadership manual from the most powerful man modern China has ever seen.

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership skills

 

***

 

The Leadership Journey: How to Master the Four Critical Areas of Being a Great Leader

Author: Gary Burnison

Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (February 1, 2016)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership skills

 

***

Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

Author: Simon Sinek

Publisher: Portfolio; Rep Rev edition (May 23, 2017)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership skills

 

***

Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity

Author: Kim Scott

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press (March 14, 2017)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership skills

 

***

 

Humble Consulting: How to Provide Real Help Faster

Author: Edgar H. Schein

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers; 1 edition (April 4, 2016)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership style

 

***

 

Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career

Author: Herminia Ibarra

Publisher: Harvard Business School Press; 47739th edition (January 1, 2004)

Topic of Optimizing Leadership: leadership style

 

(Book photos source: Amazon, Harvard Business Review)

Artificial Intelligence books & articles (Harvard Extension School)

Here is the Artificial Intelligence (AI) book list from Harvard Extension School (HES), again, generously shared by our HBXer – Marvin Hansen:

Part One: AI Readings

***

Machine, Platform, Crowd: Harnessing Our Digital Future

Author: Andrew McAfee, Erik Brynjolfsson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (June 27, 2017)

 

***

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Business: A No-Nonsense Guide to Data Driven Technologies

Author: Steven Finlay

Publisher: Relativistic; 2 edition (May 28, 2017)

 

***

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies

Author: Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (January 25, 2016)

 

***

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

Author: Nick Bostrom

Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (May 1, 2016)

 

***

Immunity to Change: How to Overcome It and Unlock the Potential in Yourself and Your Organization (Leadership for the Common Good)

Author: Robert Kegan, Lisa Laskow Lahey

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (January 13, 2009)

 

 

***

Man’s Search for Meaning

Author: Viktor E. Frankl

Publisher: Beacon Press; 1 edition (June 1, 2006)

 

***

Part Two: Tech Learning

***

Deep Learning with Python

Author: Francois Chollet

Publisher: Manning Publications; 1 edition (January 30, 2018)

 

***

Deep Learning (Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning series)

Author: Ian Goodfellow, Yoshua Bengio, Aaron Courville

Publisher: The MIT Press (November 18, 2016)

 

***

 

The Deep Learning Revolution (MIT Press)

Author: Terrence J. Sejnowski

Publisher: The MIT Press (May 25, 2018)

 

***

Part Three: AI Articles

 

  1. Reshaping Business With Artificial Intelligence (MIT Sloan Management Review)

  2. AI will redefine the role of manager

  3. A sober view of AI will lead to more effective innovation

  4. How to Deal With the Elephant in the Room

 

(Book photos source: Amazon)

Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice

Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice

Author: Clayton M. Christensen, Karen Dillon, Taddy Hall, David S. Duncan

Publisher: HarperBusiness; 1 edition (October 4, 2016)

HBXer–Marvin Hansen’s comment:

  • It is worth reading the book Competing Against Luck from cover to cover. I got an early access of the ebook a few days before the printed version was published. By the time the print was out, I already read the ebook completely. I cannot emphasize enough the transformative nature of the underlying JTBD theory. However, the way we used to think about JTBD suffered from a few shortcomings and I have witnessed these in practice. Competing against luck addresses and solves all of these issues and thus makes establishes a sound and solid foundation. Point is, you need to figure out what really your customer tries to progress and what exactly your customer’s most valuable performance defining component is. In most cases, your customer has also a crucial detail you better cover along the way. When you focu all effort on these three things you just nail whatever the job is.
  • The review of the book: The 8 step The Job Map™ framework for practical application of the JTBD theory.

 

HBXer-Sascha López’s comment:

  •  I can attest to how good this book is ? thoroughly good read

 

HBXer–Jingning Ao’s Recommendation:

  • This book was mentioned today (June 27, 2017) at the final session of Managing Your Career Development.
  • Luck was discussed several times during this HBX Live Program, but the point is NOT to wait for luck, but to actively work out the progress in life. We have the situational (push) and desired (pull) forces in making decisions and changes,  the awareness and the balance between these forces can help us decide better.
  • Managing Your Career Development is GREAT!!!

 

(Book photo source: Amazon)

Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment

Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment

Author: Anita Elberse

Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st Edition, 1st Printing edition (October 15, 2013)

HBXer–Jingning Ao’s Recommendation:

  • I was taking the 4th session of HBX-Managing Your Career Development led by Prof. Elberse earlier today. Prof. Elberse’s insightful research in the entertainment industry amazed me tons! I’m currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Leisure Studies, and we always say “We Make A Living By Doing What We Love”, it really corresponds to her points in today’s session that try to learn from the superstars and thrive to be multi-hyphenate. As Prof. Clayton Christensen recommended: “There is hope—because the world truly is entertaining. Blockbusters is a delightful, thought-provoking book.
  • Let the world be our playground 😉

 

(Book photo source: Amazon)

Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide

Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide

Author: Linda Babcock, Sara Laschever

Publisher: Princeton University Press (September 22, 2003)

HBXer–Joshua Senne’s Recommendation:

  • I’m taking a negotiation course as part of my executive education at Stanford and wanted to post the recommended readings from the course if your interested in reading more about negotiation and such.
(Book photo source: Amazon)

Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street

Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street

Author: John Brooks

Publisher: Open Road Media; Reprint edition (July 8, 2014)

HBXer–Mike Oren’s Comments:

  • It’s from the 60s and is a favorite book by Warren Buffett and Bill Gates. I recently started reading it myself, and it seems like a great explanation of market panic (although I think there’s a lot more–this starting it).
(Book photo source: Amazon)

 

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement

Author: Eliyahu M. Goldratt

Publisher: North River Press; 30th Anniversary Edition edition (June 1, 2014)

HBXer–Rafael Rosales’ Comments:

  • I have a really great book I think every person in our HBX family should read: The Goal by Eliyahu Goldratt.
  • This novel teaches you the concept of “Theory of Constraints” in a way that is mesmerizing! It is very easy to read because the author explains everything in a simple manner. I promise all my HBX colleagues that you will be hooked from page 1 because you will learn about concepts via the interactions each of the characters.
  • You will learn the importance of breaking a complex problem into smaller batches that will enable you as a manager to effectively and successfully solve them.
  • Although this novel at first seems like one that will be read by engineers or business students, i can assure you that my friends in social and science fields have greatly benefitted by reading it. The author makes such a great narrative that the reader doesn’t need to have prior knowledge to understand the information and lessons.
(Book photo source: Amazon)

The Innovator’s Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change)

The Innovator’s Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change)

Author: Clayton M. Christensen

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; Reprint edition (January 5, 2016)

 

(Book photo source: Amazon)

The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite

The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite

Author: Duff McDonald

Publisher: HarperBusiness (April 25, 2017)

HBXers’ Comments:

  • Martin Ko: I write to please inquire whether anyone of you plans to read this soon-to-be published book/expose on Harvard Business School. I thought it might be of interest to some.
  • Mahesh Reddy: Preordered just now
  • Varun Sharma: Just preordered it, looks like a super exciting read!
  • Jingning Ao: I pre-ordered the Wisdom of Finance, not too late to get this one too! Thank you for sharing it!
  • Tamara Daniels: What I find interesting about the title of this book is that it contradicts what we’ve been learning in all of the HBX courses. I haven’t taken a single one that doesn’t heavily stress the importance of having integrity as a leader and doing what is right by humanity. So what the hypotheses of this book primarily outlines as a fault of Harvard is something that has been blindsided by personal choice. People choose to do good or bad regardless of what they’ve been taught. I, on the other hand, would like to know how to blend in with the personality type that is the focus of this book. How do you become that person and is it like a superpower that you can turn on or off at will? What we see in society is that those who are most aggressive and have a take no prisoners, fearless approach to life are the ones who win all of the time—high achievers. While it is those who try to play fair and appease others who often lose and are left behind.
  • Tamara Daniels: I would love to hear how others respond to them.

Relevant News: Why Harvard Business School is Under Fire

  • Jingning Ao: This news is based on the new book “The Golden Passport” by Duff McDonald, I haven’t finished reading the book, but I disagrees with the saying that “It has established big thinkers such as Michael Porter on its staff but has so far not produced a new generation of stars.”  Only time can tell great thinkers, at least I found that professor Bharat Anand’s book depicted the technology-era world precisely and intriguingly. Plus HBX has benefited and inspired countless people to get the learning opportunity to be “big thinkers”.
  • Mike Oren: I was reading this article yesterday and discussed it briefly with my girlfriend, who is doing her PhD in Economics at UChicago. Both of us felt it has less to do with Harvard and more to do with larger trends. Also that any prediction of downfall are ridiculously premature (decade at the earliest).
  • Hector Javier: The headline sounds a bit like click bait, tbh
  • Rafael Rosales: Completely agree! The thesis statement is not backed up!
  • Babatunde Olaniyi: Nothing is going to stop me applying next year
  • Martin Ko: I do agree with much that has been posted about this article (I was just about to share it with this group before you posted it, Jingning, thanks for doing so) but I did find the following to be rather troubling at Harvard Business School: “It has failed to manage conflicts of interest adequately: for example it gives companies a veto over case studies written about them and academics can be paid by the companies they teach about. The school has tried to diversify its intake of pupils, but even after adjusting for the financial aid it gives out, the effective average fee for an MBA course has risen by about 30% in five years.” The conflicts of interest could be better managed and handled, I think.
  • Mike Oren: The case study we read for the MYCD week 1 had a potential conflict of interest that was resolved with another part of the story being written, which ultimately made for an even stronger case. Also, being a former academic (not in business), I can tell you that this is an issue across the board. If your research receives funding from a business it almost always needs to be approved by their legal department prior to publication to protect their IP and brand. There are ways this is balanced, but it seems HBS is balancing it in much the same way as other institutions.
(Book photo source: Amazon)